Computer Says No

I’ve just been doing a bit of browsing and of course I’ve discovered yet more skulduggery regarding Waterhouse and the Macur Review. On March 17 2016 Stephen Crabb, the Secretary of State for Wales, made a statement in the Commons on the publication of the Macur Review. Crabb stated that when the Welsh Office was disbanded in 1999 – how convenient that the Whitehall Dept responsible for covering up the activities of the paedophile gang was disbanded just before the Waterhouse Report was published, just as Clwyd County Council was dissolved in 1996 the minute that the Jillings Report was submitted – ‘the files that it held on newly dissolved issues such as social care and children’s services were transferred to the National Assembly of Wales. This included the Waterhouse computer database. When Lady Justice Macur requested this, it was found that in 2008 the Welsh Government IT contractors had declared that it’s contents were ‘corrupted and unreadable’ and they had therefore been destroyed. She finds that it was an ‘innocent mistake, rather than a calculated ploy’.

So a load more crucial evidence relating to the North Wales Child Abuse Scandal has been destroyed and yet again, there is nothing suspicious about it at all. Just as the warehouse fire that destroyed all the Bryn Alyn records as Ronnie began his Inquiry prevented anyone from tracing all the children who passed through Bryn Alyn. That was one hell of a bonfire as well – some houses nearby were destroyed as well, so intense was the heat.

I note that after Crabb made his statement, Albert Owen the Labour MP for Ynys Mon spoke and mentioned that he had encountered constituents having difficulty obtaining their records, especially from the Gwynedd Authority.

It’s just as well that I’m storing my own 10,000 documents then isn’t it. (I’ve made copies too in case of non-suspicious outbursts of fire.) Particularly as Gary Doherty, the CEO of the Betsi is claiming that most of these documents don’t actually exist.

 

Author: Sally Baker

I am a writer and a sociologist, originally from Somerset, but I've been based in Wales for most of my life. I had my first encounter with a mental health professional in 1984 at the age of 21. My GP described this man to my then partner - who also became a sociologist - as someone who had experienced 'considerable success'. My meeting with this psychiatrist was a disaster and we attempted to complain about his insensitivity and highly inappropriate behaviour. That was the first time we were threatened and pressurised to withdraw a complaint against a mental health professional. This man is long dead - he was a retired psychiatrist from the North Wales Hospital Denbigh, T. Gwynne Williams, who was working shifts in the student health centre at University College of North Wales (now Bangor University). We discovered years later that this 'successful man' was notorious - he had been an enthusiastic lobotomist...

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